Clinuvel

johnnytech

Moderator
Staff member
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"Over 2 billion individuals have inefficient DNA repair mechanism"

I always like this statement. Basically, the market has already been created by nature due to small mutations of the MC1R gene.
Wait, so people without this mutation, their bodies can already do this... I.e. there is a natural ability of DNA repair?

I guess I missed the memo that DNA repair was a natural trait.

And while we're on the topic, can we discuss what exactly DNA repair means? I've always assumed it to mean something similar to how the skin heals after a bad sunburn or a rash.... but now apply this to a small lesion of the skin that might even be cancerous.

Is this mutation in the MC1R gene related to a breakdown of systemic anti-inflammation in anyway?

Deep dive please.
 

investek

Well-known member
Wait, so people without this mutation, their bodies can already do this... I.e. there is a natural ability of DNA repair?

I guess I missed the memo that DNA repair was a natural trait.

And while we're on the topic, can we discuss what exactly DNA repair means? I've always assumed it to mean something similar to how the skin heals after a bad sunburn or a rash.... but now apply this to a small lesion of the skin that might even be cancerous.

Is this mutation in the MC1R gene related to a breakdown of systemic anti-inflammation in anyway?

Deep dive please.
This is probably a decent starting point…
 

Justinian

Well-known member
@johnnytech This could just refer to MC1R. People who can tan well have fully functional MC1R. If they get sunburned, they repair the DNA damage more efficiently (but not perfectly). Partial loss of function is common in more lighter skinned people (I think Fitzpatrick skin type 2-3). Full loss of function (or maybe it's just more extreme loss of function, I forget) is for very fair skin people, such as those with red hair and Fitzpatrick skin type 1). Natural Alpha MSH does not bind well to partial/full loss of function MC1R. Early research decades ago showed Afamelanotide and other analogues do bind to loss of function MC1R receptors. Zalfa Abdel-Malek (somebody posted about her research a few weeks ago) did a lot of research into this.

I know this has been debated before on here, but I wouldn't expect any longer term type of DNA repair but would be pleasantly surprised if that is the case.
 

Johnny H

Well-known member
I might need some help from the accounting/numbers guys here to get a definitive answer here:

Wolgen has previously stated the total cost of bringing Scenesse to market. I can't remember the exact number, but it was in the ballpark of $150 million, which is a fraction of the average cost of commercializing a drug (in the very low billions, iirc).

A brief glance at the EOY report would suggest that cumulative revenues are approaching this number, and it may have occurred already.

In other words, less than 5 years after commencing commercial operations, and less than 2 years after FDA approval, Clinuvel has already recouped the entirety of its development costs for Scenesse.

I'm not sure how common it is to achieve such a milestone only 2 years after approval, but it seems like it's something to be celebrated, perhaps with a press release.
 

macgyver

Well-known member
Not sure what’s happening with the XP trials now, maybe the OTCs will be delayed until they’ve completed one trial at least to have clinical backing for the products.

Feeling confident we should see preliminary results from the AIS trial this year. They’ll need some good news to push votes for staff remuneration packages.
 

Johnny H

Well-known member
@Texas T Cumulative revenue is not the same as profit. Clinuvel still has significant operating costs.

The point being, such a milestone should be publicized, as it signals to investors that Clinuvel's flagship product has been de-risked. Most drugs are never approved, and many that are (cough cough Vylessi) may never earn enough to recoup costs.
 

endymion96

2nd Longest Active Member
Not sure what’s happening with the XP trials now, maybe the OTCs will be delayed until they’ve completed one trial at least to have clinical backing for the products.
That is my gut feeling too ... don't want to put the cart before the horse. I don't think we will see too much on OTC until the XP trails are well in hand and manufacturing is up and running. If you've ever seen the show "Shark Tank" where promising small upstart companies come begging for venture capital to launch their products, one of the prime points of failure is not having enough stock to keep up with demand. I can not see putting much emphasis on skin care products that are not yet in inventory.
 

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