Trademarks / Patents / IP Patents of Fran McEvoy, Clinuvel Engineer (for future reference)

macgyver

Well-known member
We know afamelanotide doesn't permeate the BBB well. However regarding stroke, acting on the blood vessels itself to prevent inflammation and strengthening the BBB after a serious event is likely to improve the outlook for the patient. Melanotan-II is cyclised so it will permeate the BBB more so, but the only other molecules in Clinuvel's stable are skin related (CUV9900, phimelanotide, parvysmelanotide, VRX001). The research done by Daniela Guiliani (as recently posted by Uhoh and @investek here) discovered intense inducement of neuogenesis from a-msh, in addition to what it already does when acting on the blood vessels and facilitating the automatic process of neurogenesis following a stroke.

I'm not clear on the science, but I wonder if a dissolvable implant of a-msh inserted into the penumbra closest to the necrotic core might stimulate intense neurogenesis essentially giving that process a supercharged effect and salvaging more of the penumbra than just acting on the blood vessels alone. Initially I thought Mr McEvoy might've been hired to design a device to insert Enfance, but that seems utterly basic for someone of his expertise. Looking forward to seeing what comes out of this.
 
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macgyver

Well-known member
This lady talks about delivering drugs via a catheter system directly into brain tissue, of which she mentions at one point delivering drugs into the penumbra of a glioblastoma. This procedure has been used in 46 Parkinson's disease patients. The procedure device/system shown here doesn't look particularly 'elegant' but if it works...

I'm of the opinion now that this is a feasible proposition to insert Afamelanotide directly into the penumbra. Neurosurgery methods concerning catheters are widespread, and having watched a few Medtronic videos (Fran McEvoy's former employer) it seems a straightforward process (animations can turn the observer into a neurosurgeon overnight;)). The only concerns would be the composition of the implant itself and the reaction of the brain to the foreign implant within its tissue.

 
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johnnytech

Moderator
Staff member
Melanotan-II is cyclised so it will permeate the BBB more so,
How is MT1 different from MT2 in this regard?

And does this equate to MT2 being a better anti inflammatory for systemic inflammation diseases in regards to a low dosage anti-aging regimen?
 

macgyver

Well-known member
How is MT1 different from MT2 in this regard?

And does this equate to MT2 being a better anti inflammatory for systemic inflammation diseases in regards to a low dosage anti-aging regimen?
From my very limited understanding, MT1 differs from MT2 in that it doesn’t have a ‘conformational’ structure like MT2, it tends to break off into pieces which is why it mostly manifests in secondary effects in the body. Whereas MT2 has a cyclised (‘conformational’) structure enabling it to maintain its integrity and hold together longer as it gets absorbed. So I guess when it comes to the BBB, it stays together long enough to crossover and have a direct impact in the brain? So to answer the second part of your question I would say yes if you’re talking about the brain as more melanocortin is getting across the BBB, other systemic inflammation I'm not so sure. It would end up having a similar effect I'd imagine.
 
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macgyver

Well-known member
Re-edit:

I was reading through the Wilsons' initiation analysis of CUV and in it they briefly discussed AIS. They found it unusual that Clinuvel has proceeded with Scenesse because it doesn't cross the blood brain barrier. This has been discussed before on ShareTease, but its an important distinction because while crossing the blood brain barrier may not be required for afamelanotide to have a neuroprotective effect in strokes, it may be a barrier to treating other CNS disorders. They mentioned Prenumbra, which they view positively given its high dosage/instant uptake capabilities. They also mentioned the possibility of administering afamelantoide intrathecally, either via the spinal cord similar to an epidural for pregnant women or directly into the brain itself e.g Ommaya reservoir. They recognise this would bring a unique set of clinical challenges, but the very mention of intrathecally- administered afamelanotide adds another layer of intrigue to what Mr McEvoy might be creating at Clinuvel.
 
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macgyver

Well-known member

Looking at revascularization techniques where the talent of McEvoy might be employed, I came across this patent application which is fairly out there. The authors made a claim for a hydrogel to deliver drugs to an infarct site in the hope of revascularization and regenerating brain tissue or neurons. I’ve yet to go through it in detail but I felt it relevant to post here for future reference.
 
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